Academic Controversy and Team Analysis

Module Eleven: Academic Controversy and Team Analysis

Aims:

1. To extend participants’ instructional repertoire with particular reference to complex co-operative learning strategies.

2.  To acquaint participants withthe strategy of Academic Controversy as developed by Roger and David Johnson.

3. To acquaint participants with the strategy of Team Analysis asdeveloped by Richard Elson.

4. To develop participants’ understanding of how the integration of these complex processes generates more powerful student learning experiences.

5. To enable participants to articulate how these strategies are interweaved with various skills, tactics and strategies.

6. To enhance participants’ understanding of social theory, critical thinking and brain research as these apply to the strategies of Academic Controversy and Team Analysis.

 

Content:

  • A rationale for the integration of Academic Controversy and Team Analysis in classroom practice: promoting dialectical thinking and considering different perspectives.
  • A review of the centrality of social and communication skills to effective co-operative learning (Johnson brothers)
  • An explanation of the Eight Steps associated with Academic Controversy
  • An explanation of the Five Phases of Team Analysis
  • Critical thinking and de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats: How they connect to Academic Controversy and Team Analysis
  • An exploration of the dimensions of Critical Thinking
  • An exploration of Socratic Dialogue and its relevance to the skill of framing questions effectively.
  • Consideration of some sample lessons relating to Academic Controversy and Team Analysis.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of their engagement with this module, participants will:

1. Be able to integrate the strategies of Academic Controversy and Team Analysis effectively in their classroom practice

2. Be able to articulate the complex nature of these strategies inrelation to other strategies encountered;

3. Be able to articulate the philosophical rationale for invoking these strategies in the classroom.